Keynote speakers and IAMG Awardees

Keynote Speakers

IAMG Awardees

Keynote Speakers

Bruno Lévy

Bruno Lévy is the director of the Inria Nancy Grand-Est research center, one of the eight research centers of Inria, the French research institute for research in digital science and technology.
He defended his Ph.D. on computational topology and its applications to subsurface modeling at INPL in 1999, then did a post-doc at Stanford, then joined Inria in 2000.
From 2000 to 2015 he worked on surface parameterization, mesh generation and optimal sampling. In addition to computer graphics, Bruno's work has impacted the area of meshing and simulation of complex geological structures. Since 2015, he has been working on computational physics, and more specifically on applications of optimal transport to fluid dynamics and cosmology.

Talk title: Computational optimal transport

I will give an introduction to optimal transport, a mathematical theory that makes it possible to measure distances between functions (or distances between more general objects), to interpolate between objects or to enforce mass/volume conservation in certain computational physics simulations. Optimal transport is a rich scientific domain, with active research communities, both on its theoretical aspects and on more applicative considerations, such as geometry processing and machine learning. I will summarize the main principles behind the theory of optimal transport, introduce the different involved notions, and more importantly, how they relate, with the aim of giving an intuition of the elegant theory that structures them. Then we will consider a specific setting, called semi-discrete, where a continuous function is transported to a discrete sum of Dirac masses. Studying this specific setting naturally leads to an efficient computational algorithm, that uses classical notions of computational geometry, such as a generalization of Voronoi diagrams called Laguerre diagrams.

Malcolm Sambridge

Malcolm Sambridge is a Professor at the Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University (ANU) and works in the areas of Seismology and Mathematical Geophysics.
He obtained a Certificate for Advanced Study in Mathematics from Cambridge University in 1984, and a PhD in Geophysics from ANU in 1989. He worked at the Carnegie Institution in Whashington, at the University of Cambridge and at Caltech's Seismological Lab.
He published over 150 peer-reviewed papers covering data inference methods, inverse theory, computational seismology, wave propagation, earthquakes and earth structure, mathematical methods, statistical inference applied to the Earth Sciences, Monte Carlo methods and optimization.
In the area of Mathematical Geosciences, he made significant contributions the application of Voronoi diagrams to solve geophysical and geodynamic problems. Most importantly, the cornerstone of Malcom's research has been stochastic Bayesian methods for solving inverse problems in the geosciences. One can cite in particular the 'neighborhood algorithm', which he introduced to solve inverse problems based solely on proximity information. More recently, he focused on transdimensional inversion, where the number of model parameters is unknown.
Among other scientific awards and recognitions, Malcolm is a Fellow and Vice President of the Australian Academy of Science, and a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU).

Talk title: Optimal transport and Geophysical inversion

The field of optimal transport is thought to have originated in the 19th century, when legend has it that Napoleon asked Gaspard Monge to rearrange his sand castles. That started a 200 year story of discovery and re-discovery of the mathematics of how to map, or transport, one curve (or probability distribution on to another). Leonid Kantorovich reformulated Monge’s problem in terms of more familiar linear programming which contributed to his winning the 1975 Nobel prize for economics. Cedric Villani pioneered the modern mathematical treatment of the topic and was awarded the 2010 Fields medal.
What has all of this got to do with Geophysics? Here exploration geophysicists have led the way and shown how to exploit OT in Full seismic waveform inversion. It turns out that optimal transport may be used as an alternate to Least squares measures to create a new type of data misfit function. It has been demonstrated that it has significant potential in nonlinear inversion by reducing the presence of local minima in misfit functions which would otherwise by highly multi-modal. Over the past decade this has created a flurry of excitement and activity in Seismic Waveform inversion in exploration geophysics, and a gradual appreciation of the topic more broadly. This talk will introduce OT for geophysical inversion in a more general context, and also discuss some new ideas and open questions which, as always, take the form of how do we best exploit these `pure’ mathematical concepts in an effective manner for practical outcomes.

Colin Daly

Colin did a degree in mathematics at Trinity College Dublin and a PhD in Geostatistics at the Ecole des Mines de Paris. He joined BP Research working on algorithmic development and applying the methods in field studies across most of the basins in which BP operated at the time. As the subject matured the inevitable division of labour between practitioners and developers deepened in most companies. He opted to go with the development side leaving BP to work initially with Roxar and then with Schlumberger where he initially worked on commercial software, particularly with the Petrel platform. Contact with the range of software users and the surprisingly wide variety of ways that they can use an algorithm has led to him taking an interest in robust design particularly as tools from Machine Learning become available for spatial probability models.

Talk title: more information comming soon

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Marie Colette Van Lieshout

Marie-Colette van Lieshout was educated at Free University and CWI Amsterdam. She started her career as lecturer at the University of Warwick before moving back to CWI as senior researcher. She also holds a chair in spatial stochastics at the University of Twente. She has published around 60 scientific papers and 5 books in stochastic geometry, spatial statistics and image analysis. Her research concerns the modelling and analysis of complicated geometrical structures such as point and object processes, random fields and tessellation models. Van Lieshout is an elected member of the ISI (International Statistical Institute). She is a board member of the Dutch Royal Mathematics Society, currently serving as its secretary, a member of the council of the Bernoulli Society, and was a member of the editorial boards of several journals, including Bernoulli and Methodology and Computing in Applied Probability.

Talk title: Parametric and non-parametric monitoring of induced seismicity in the Groningen gas field

more information comming soon

IAMG Awardees

John Carranza - William Christian Krumbein Medal 2022

E.J.M. (John) Carranza started his career as exploration geologist/geochemist (1983–2001) in the Bureau of Mines & Geosciences of the Philippines. He was researcher (2001–2003) and then Associate Professor (2003–2012) at the University of Twente (The Netherlands). He was Associate Professor (2013–2016) at the James Cook University (Australia). He was Visiting Professor (2015–2017) at the State University of Campinas (Brazil). He was Professor of Geological Sciences (2017–2021) at the University of KwaZulu–Natal (South Africa). He is currently Professor of Economic Geology at the University of the Free State (South Africa). His fields of expertise are

  • geochemistry for mineral exploration, ore genesis and geo-environmental studies,
  • spatial mathematics/statistics for predictive modeling of mineral resources and geological hazards, and
  • remote sensing for geological/mineral exploration.

Talk title: Multi-scale Spatial Patterns of Mineral Deposits: Their Exploration Significance

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Philippe Renard - John Cedric Griffiths Teaching Award 2022

Dr. Philippe Renard is Associate Professor of Hydrogeology at the University of Neuchatel Switzerland where he leads the Stochastic Hydrogeology Group. He graduated from the Nancy School of Geology in Nancy, France and obtained his PhD from Paris School of Mines in 1996. His research focuses on stochastic hydrogeology and aquifer. In geostatistics, he has developed multiple- point statistics methods and their applications to a wide range of problems from 3-D geological modeling to the simulation of climate variables. Renard has been the editor of Hydrogeology Journal, president of the geoENVia association and manages the Hydrogeologist Time Capsule.

Talk title: more information comming soon

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Qiuming Cheng - Distinguished Lecturer 2022

Professor Qiuming Cheng is an internationally recognized leader in mathematical geosciences. His pioneering research on the new fractal density theory and nonlinear mathematical models for singularity analysis made major impacts on several geoscientific disciplines, including those concerned with extreme geological events originated from nonlinear processes of plate tectonics such as formation of supercontinents, magmatism, mid-ocean ridge heat flow, earthquakes and mineralization. His multifractal filtering and singularity analysis techniques are now routinely applied for anomaly identification in mineral exploration and environmental assessment.
Professor Cheng has received several prestigious awards including the William Christian Krumbein Medal, the highest award bestowed by the International Association for Mathematical Geosciences (2008), the National Science and Technology Progress Award awarded by the Chinese Government (2013), and the AAG Gold Medal, the highest award bestowed by the International Association of Applied Geochemists (AAG) (2021). Professor Cheng served as associate editor for Computers & Geosciences and the Journal of Exploration Geochemistry. Professor Cheng co-chaired two IAMG Annual Conferences (Toronto, 2005, Beijing, 2007). He has served as President of the International Association for Mathematical Geosciences (2012-2016), President of the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) (2016-2020) and member of the Committee of Science Planning of International Science Council (ISC) (2019-). Professor Cheng was elected a Member of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) (2019) and a foreign member of Academia European (MAE) (2020). He is now a professor at the School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University.

Talk title: more information comming soon

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